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Please help me with this Question

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1 Please help me with this Question on Mon Jan 31, 2011 3:16 am

Assalaamu Alaykum

I have been stuck on this question and can't seem to find the answer.

Is it possible for a mawsoof and siffah structure to become a mawsoof for something else.

e.g. Alhamdu Lillahi Hamdan Katheeran Tayyiban

Over here can Hamdan Katheeran become mawsoof for tayyiban?? Because then we can say that the many praises are being described by purity??

JazakAllah for your time!

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2 Re: Please help me with this Question on Sun Feb 06, 2011 11:43 am

Wa Alaykumus Salaam wa Rahmatullahi wa Barakaatuhu

I had a go at grammatically breaking it down:

((الحمد))

مبتدأ مرفوع بالضمّة

Subject, nominative by the dammah

((ل))

حرف جرٍّ

Preposition

((الله))

اسم مجرور بالكسرة

Noun (after preposition) genitive by the kasrah

((حمدًا))

مفعول به منصوب بالفتحة

Object, accusative by the fathah

((كثيرًا))

نعت منصوب بالفتحة

Adjective, accusative by the fathah

((طيِّبًا))

نعت منصوب بالفتحة

Adjective, accusative by the fathah

((مباركًا))

نعت منصوب بالفتحة

Adjective, accusative by the fathah

((في))

حرف جرٍّ

Preposition

((ه))

اسم مجرور بالكسرة

Noun (after preposition) genitive by the kasrah

Translation: The praise is for Allah, abundant, excellent, blessed praise (in it)

All praise is due to Allah, praise which is abundant, excellent and blessed.

(In it) ‘it’ is referred to praise and so 'praise' becomes the object which as you mentioned is the noun qualified (mawsoofun)-to be more precise we’d mention what the noun qualified is hence I wrote maf'oolun bih.

'Praise' is described as abundant, excellent and blessed; there can be as many adjectives as you wish; but the noun qualified (mawsoofun) will always come first and the adjectives string along afterwards as opposed to the English language where the adjectives come first and then the noun qualified. Otherwise it would be difficult to recognize which word is the noun qualified and which words are the adjectives, as they all agree in terms of definition, case, gender and number.

When we grammatically break down a sentence, it’s better to use na’tun, as sifatun is only mentioned in speech, hence the reason why I referred to the adjectives as na’tun.

I’m not 100% sure as to whether the above is correct as I’m still a beginner student myself and I’m not sure about the verb and subject (are they omitted?); I await the seniors’ and ustaadh’s response.

I’m sorry, I’m not sure whether my translation is correct, may I ask where the word purity came from?

Wassalaam

Anzeena



Last edited by Anzeena on Thu Feb 10, 2011 3:07 pm; edited 2 times in total (Reason for editing : error)

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3 Re: Please help me with this Question on Mon Feb 07, 2011 6:55 am

Assalaamu Alaykum

Jazakumullah for answering the question.

The translation of purity is taken from Arabic to Urdu dictionary. Under the word tayyibthe meaning is given as 'paakeeza' which means purity in English, although this meaning isn't written in Hans Weir. To confirm though I need to get hold of a classical Arabic to Arabic dictionary.

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